8 Night Driving Tips for Older Drivers

8 Night Driving Tips for Older Drivers

As we age, our eyesight changes. It’s especially noticeable at night when driving. Glare can become a big issue, whether it be from oncoming headlights or street lights. Glare can be compounded when it’s raining or when the roads are otherwise wet. Because it’s dark, you might not see street signs as easily as you once did. Even seeing people, animals, or things directly out of your line of sight is harder to see at night. You may reach the point where you avoid night driving to avoid the stress.

If you do need to venture out after dark, these tips can help:

  • Have your eyes checked–every 1 to 2 years if you’re over 65. These exams can diagnose eye problems such as cataracts, macular degeneration, or cataracts.
  • Keep your wiper blades and windshield clean.
  • If your car’s headlights are cloudy, have them cleaned for better visibility.
  • If you wear glasses, always wear them when driving; apply an anti-glare coating.
  • Don’t look directly into oncoming headlights; look away to avoid temporary blindness. Look for the road line to the right of the pavement as a guide.
  • Move your eyes; try not to stay focused in the middle area lit by your headlights. Watch for unanticipated spots of lights around curves, at intersections, or at hilltops. Doing so will warn you of oncoming vehicles.
  • Keep distance between the vehicle in front of you; don’t follow closer than fewer than 4 seconds behind another car
  • Focus on an object’s outlines rather than the object itself; your eyes will adjust more easily.
  • Cut back on night driving if you are having trouble seeing in the dark.

Check out our other senior living newsletter articles.